just—maps:

Map of each U.S. States Favorite Foods [3294x2304][OC]

I have spent 2+ years in 6 of these states and … I have yet to eat any of their designated foods. Wow.

just—maps:

Map of each U.S. States Favorite Foods [3294x2304][OC]

I have spent 2+ years in 6 of these states and … I have yet to eat any of their designated foods. Wow.


I said, “The only way I can play someone this hard is for something to be peeled away each week, and the first thing that needs to go is the wig.” I just wanted to deal with her hair. It’s a big thing with African-American women…You start when you’re just a young girl. Do you twist it? Do you leave it natural when it’s so hard to take care of? Then you start wearing wigs but every night before bed you’ve got to take the wig off and deal with your hair underneath. And it’s a part of Annalise that I needed the writers to deal with because I’ve never seen it, ever, on TV and I thought it would be very powerful. It’s part of her mask. - Viola Davis (x)


Viola Davis is the best.
Zoom Info

I said, “The only way I can play someone this hard is for something to be peeled away each week, and the first thing that needs to go is the wig.” I just wanted to deal with her hair. It’s a big thing with African-American women…You start when you’re just a young girl. Do you twist it? Do you leave it natural when it’s so hard to take care of? Then you start wearing wigs but every night before bed you’ve got to take the wig off and deal with your hair underneath. And it’s a part of Annalise that I needed the writers to deal with because I’ve never seen it, ever, on TV and I thought it would be very powerful. It’s part of her mask. - Viola Davis (x)


Viola Davis is the best.
Zoom Info

I said, “The only way I can play someone this hard is for something to be peeled away each week, and the first thing that needs to go is the wig.” I just wanted to deal with her hair. It’s a big thing with African-American women…You start when you’re just a young girl. Do you twist it? Do you leave it natural when it’s so hard to take care of? Then you start wearing wigs but every night before bed you’ve got to take the wig off and deal with your hair underneath. And it’s a part of Annalise that I needed the writers to deal with because I’ve never seen it, ever, on TV and I thought it would be very powerful. It’s part of her mask. - Viola Davis (x)


Viola Davis is the best.
Zoom Info

I said, “The only way I can play someone this hard is for something to be peeled away each week, and the first thing that needs to go is the wig.” I just wanted to deal with her hair. It’s a big thing with African-American women…You start when you’re just a young girl. Do you twist it? Do you leave it natural when it’s so hard to take care of? Then you start wearing wigs but every night before bed you’ve got to take the wig off and deal with your hair underneath. And it’s a part of Annalise that I needed the writers to deal with because I’ve never seen it, ever, on TV and I thought it would be very powerful. It’s part of her mask. - Viola Davis (x)


Viola Davis is the best.
Zoom Info

I said, “The only way I can play someone this hard is for something to be peeled away each week, and the first thing that needs to go is the wig.” I just wanted to deal with her hair. It’s a big thing with African-American women…You start when you’re just a young girl. Do you twist it? Do you leave it natural when it’s so hard to take care of? Then you start wearing wigs but every night before bed you’ve got to take the wig off and deal with your hair underneath. And it’s a part of Annalise that I needed the writers to deal with because I’ve never seen it, ever, on TV and I thought it would be very powerful. It’s part of her mask. - Viola Davis (x)

Viola Davis is the best.

allronix:

starberth:

allronix:

Agreed, particularly because Flynn viewed Quorra as a “gift” to users and therefore his perception of her (as portrayed in the film canon, at least) doesn’t allow her to develop any kind of agency. It’s unclear what, if any, actual feelings he might have about Quorra beyond her commodified value to others. I hope sequels (fingers crossed) explore the nature of individual agency in and between the various worlds & systems—the 1982 film set up some interesting hints.

Which brings up and interesting point that Lisberger, Horowitz, Kitiss, Kosinski, and even Monolith and Slave Labor Graphics danced around: 
OK, we unknowingly created sentient synthetic life. Even humble insurance software takes the Turing Test and blows it to subatomic particles. They have their own world, their own society. And, for the most part, they are a willing servant race. 
Oh, crap. Where would anyone begin when it comes to treating the Programs ethically?! 

Wouldn’t that make for a wonderful multigenerational saga, though? It’s a can of worms, yes, but the writer in me says ‘material!’ Those ethical questions could drive an incredible, intense sequel … and open up the potential for a dark second act of “Blade Runner” proportions.

Disney’s not likely to go here because…Disney. That’s some potentially explosive stuff, even by MCU standards. 
Still, might be interesting if you split some of the conflict between Sam and Jet. (That is, if you can find a way to salvage 2.0 from the dustbin) Sam never saw helpful Programs, but he did see plenty of them trying to get him and Quorra killed. They imprisoned and killed his dad, butchered Quorra’s people, and even the great champion was twisted into a monster. Jet had the flip side of that equation; plenty of friendly Programs (the ones who tried to kill him were either corrupted or mistaken, mostly), but a lot of hostile humans looking at that world with greed and lust for power. We don’t know yet how Sam will process his experience, but we do have Jet “on panel” (sort of) having mixed feelings at best about being a User.   

You’re right on all points, of course.  I think what Sam brought in “Legacy” was the childlike wonder of a new world, of new adventures, which cuts across all Disney films.  It’s not always realistic, but it serves as an entry point for new watchers, who often need that sort of touchstone to relax into the experience of what is, essentially, an alien environment. I don’t know if I’m remembering correctly, or not, but I think Kosinski and possibly even Wilde have mentioned the working draft for a sequel leaves much more of the action in the outside/User world. If that’s true, we don’t need as much childlike wonder (though Quorra, perhaps, would show it?). Sam could go to a darker place and not lose his appeal as a character, in my opinion.But really, once you put the revolution of science, religion, medicine, and everything else on the table…character development could quite literally go anywhere.
Zoom Info
allronix:

starberth:

allronix:

Agreed, particularly because Flynn viewed Quorra as a “gift” to users and therefore his perception of her (as portrayed in the film canon, at least) doesn’t allow her to develop any kind of agency. It’s unclear what, if any, actual feelings he might have about Quorra beyond her commodified value to others. I hope sequels (fingers crossed) explore the nature of individual agency in and between the various worlds & systems—the 1982 film set up some interesting hints.

Which brings up and interesting point that Lisberger, Horowitz, Kitiss, Kosinski, and even Monolith and Slave Labor Graphics danced around: 
OK, we unknowingly created sentient synthetic life. Even humble insurance software takes the Turing Test and blows it to subatomic particles. They have their own world, their own society. And, for the most part, they are a willing servant race. 
Oh, crap. Where would anyone begin when it comes to treating the Programs ethically?! 

Wouldn’t that make for a wonderful multigenerational saga, though? It’s a can of worms, yes, but the writer in me says ‘material!’ Those ethical questions could drive an incredible, intense sequel … and open up the potential for a dark second act of “Blade Runner” proportions.

Disney’s not likely to go here because…Disney. That’s some potentially explosive stuff, even by MCU standards. 
Still, might be interesting if you split some of the conflict between Sam and Jet. (That is, if you can find a way to salvage 2.0 from the dustbin) Sam never saw helpful Programs, but he did see plenty of them trying to get him and Quorra killed. They imprisoned and killed his dad, butchered Quorra’s people, and even the great champion was twisted into a monster. Jet had the flip side of that equation; plenty of friendly Programs (the ones who tried to kill him were either corrupted or mistaken, mostly), but a lot of hostile humans looking at that world with greed and lust for power. We don’t know yet how Sam will process his experience, but we do have Jet “on panel” (sort of) having mixed feelings at best about being a User.   

You’re right on all points, of course.  I think what Sam brought in “Legacy” was the childlike wonder of a new world, of new adventures, which cuts across all Disney films.  It’s not always realistic, but it serves as an entry point for new watchers, who often need that sort of touchstone to relax into the experience of what is, essentially, an alien environment. I don’t know if I’m remembering correctly, or not, but I think Kosinski and possibly even Wilde have mentioned the working draft for a sequel leaves much more of the action in the outside/User world. If that’s true, we don’t need as much childlike wonder (though Quorra, perhaps, would show it?). Sam could go to a darker place and not lose his appeal as a character, in my opinion.But really, once you put the revolution of science, religion, medicine, and everything else on the table…character development could quite literally go anywhere.
Zoom Info
allronix:

starberth:

allronix:

Agreed, particularly because Flynn viewed Quorra as a “gift” to users and therefore his perception of her (as portrayed in the film canon, at least) doesn’t allow her to develop any kind of agency. It’s unclear what, if any, actual feelings he might have about Quorra beyond her commodified value to others. I hope sequels (fingers crossed) explore the nature of individual agency in and between the various worlds & systems—the 1982 film set up some interesting hints.

Which brings up and interesting point that Lisberger, Horowitz, Kitiss, Kosinski, and even Monolith and Slave Labor Graphics danced around: 
OK, we unknowingly created sentient synthetic life. Even humble insurance software takes the Turing Test and blows it to subatomic particles. They have their own world, their own society. And, for the most part, they are a willing servant race. 
Oh, crap. Where would anyone begin when it comes to treating the Programs ethically?! 

Wouldn’t that make for a wonderful multigenerational saga, though? It’s a can of worms, yes, but the writer in me says ‘material!’ Those ethical questions could drive an incredible, intense sequel … and open up the potential for a dark second act of “Blade Runner” proportions.

Disney’s not likely to go here because…Disney. That’s some potentially explosive stuff, even by MCU standards. 
Still, might be interesting if you split some of the conflict between Sam and Jet. (That is, if you can find a way to salvage 2.0 from the dustbin) Sam never saw helpful Programs, but he did see plenty of them trying to get him and Quorra killed. They imprisoned and killed his dad, butchered Quorra’s people, and even the great champion was twisted into a monster. Jet had the flip side of that equation; plenty of friendly Programs (the ones who tried to kill him were either corrupted or mistaken, mostly), but a lot of hostile humans looking at that world with greed and lust for power. We don’t know yet how Sam will process his experience, but we do have Jet “on panel” (sort of) having mixed feelings at best about being a User.   

You’re right on all points, of course.  I think what Sam brought in “Legacy” was the childlike wonder of a new world, of new adventures, which cuts across all Disney films.  It’s not always realistic, but it serves as an entry point for new watchers, who often need that sort of touchstone to relax into the experience of what is, essentially, an alien environment. I don’t know if I’m remembering correctly, or not, but I think Kosinski and possibly even Wilde have mentioned the working draft for a sequel leaves much more of the action in the outside/User world. If that’s true, we don’t need as much childlike wonder (though Quorra, perhaps, would show it?). Sam could go to a darker place and not lose his appeal as a character, in my opinion.But really, once you put the revolution of science, religion, medicine, and everything else on the table…character development could quite literally go anywhere.
Zoom Info
allronix:

starberth:

allronix:

Agreed, particularly because Flynn viewed Quorra as a “gift” to users and therefore his perception of her (as portrayed in the film canon, at least) doesn’t allow her to develop any kind of agency. It’s unclear what, if any, actual feelings he might have about Quorra beyond her commodified value to others. I hope sequels (fingers crossed) explore the nature of individual agency in and between the various worlds & systems—the 1982 film set up some interesting hints.

Which brings up and interesting point that Lisberger, Horowitz, Kitiss, Kosinski, and even Monolith and Slave Labor Graphics danced around: 
OK, we unknowingly created sentient synthetic life. Even humble insurance software takes the Turing Test and blows it to subatomic particles. They have their own world, their own society. And, for the most part, they are a willing servant race. 
Oh, crap. Where would anyone begin when it comes to treating the Programs ethically?! 

Wouldn’t that make for a wonderful multigenerational saga, though? It’s a can of worms, yes, but the writer in me says ‘material!’ Those ethical questions could drive an incredible, intense sequel … and open up the potential for a dark second act of “Blade Runner” proportions.

Disney’s not likely to go here because…Disney. That’s some potentially explosive stuff, even by MCU standards. 
Still, might be interesting if you split some of the conflict between Sam and Jet. (That is, if you can find a way to salvage 2.0 from the dustbin) Sam never saw helpful Programs, but he did see plenty of them trying to get him and Quorra killed. They imprisoned and killed his dad, butchered Quorra’s people, and even the great champion was twisted into a monster. Jet had the flip side of that equation; plenty of friendly Programs (the ones who tried to kill him were either corrupted or mistaken, mostly), but a lot of hostile humans looking at that world with greed and lust for power. We don’t know yet how Sam will process his experience, but we do have Jet “on panel” (sort of) having mixed feelings at best about being a User.   

You’re right on all points, of course.  I think what Sam brought in “Legacy” was the childlike wonder of a new world, of new adventures, which cuts across all Disney films.  It’s not always realistic, but it serves as an entry point for new watchers, who often need that sort of touchstone to relax into the experience of what is, essentially, an alien environment. I don’t know if I’m remembering correctly, or not, but I think Kosinski and possibly even Wilde have mentioned the working draft for a sequel leaves much more of the action in the outside/User world. If that’s true, we don’t need as much childlike wonder (though Quorra, perhaps, would show it?). Sam could go to a darker place and not lose his appeal as a character, in my opinion.But really, once you put the revolution of science, religion, medicine, and everything else on the table…character development could quite literally go anywhere.
Zoom Info
allronix:

starberth:

allronix:

Agreed, particularly because Flynn viewed Quorra as a “gift” to users and therefore his perception of her (as portrayed in the film canon, at least) doesn’t allow her to develop any kind of agency. It’s unclear what, if any, actual feelings he might have about Quorra beyond her commodified value to others. I hope sequels (fingers crossed) explore the nature of individual agency in and between the various worlds & systems—the 1982 film set up some interesting hints.

Which brings up and interesting point that Lisberger, Horowitz, Kitiss, Kosinski, and even Monolith and Slave Labor Graphics danced around: 
OK, we unknowingly created sentient synthetic life. Even humble insurance software takes the Turing Test and blows it to subatomic particles. They have their own world, their own society. And, for the most part, they are a willing servant race. 
Oh, crap. Where would anyone begin when it comes to treating the Programs ethically?! 

Wouldn’t that make for a wonderful multigenerational saga, though? It’s a can of worms, yes, but the writer in me says ‘material!’ Those ethical questions could drive an incredible, intense sequel … and open up the potential for a dark second act of “Blade Runner” proportions.

Disney’s not likely to go here because…Disney. That’s some potentially explosive stuff, even by MCU standards. 
Still, might be interesting if you split some of the conflict between Sam and Jet. (That is, if you can find a way to salvage 2.0 from the dustbin) Sam never saw helpful Programs, but he did see plenty of them trying to get him and Quorra killed. They imprisoned and killed his dad, butchered Quorra’s people, and even the great champion was twisted into a monster. Jet had the flip side of that equation; plenty of friendly Programs (the ones who tried to kill him were either corrupted or mistaken, mostly), but a lot of hostile humans looking at that world with greed and lust for power. We don’t know yet how Sam will process his experience, but we do have Jet “on panel” (sort of) having mixed feelings at best about being a User.   

You’re right on all points, of course.  I think what Sam brought in “Legacy” was the childlike wonder of a new world, of new adventures, which cuts across all Disney films.  It’s not always realistic, but it serves as an entry point for new watchers, who often need that sort of touchstone to relax into the experience of what is, essentially, an alien environment. I don’t know if I’m remembering correctly, or not, but I think Kosinski and possibly even Wilde have mentioned the working draft for a sequel leaves much more of the action in the outside/User world. If that’s true, we don’t need as much childlike wonder (though Quorra, perhaps, would show it?). Sam could go to a darker place and not lose his appeal as a character, in my opinion.But really, once you put the revolution of science, religion, medicine, and everything else on the table…character development could quite literally go anywhere.
Zoom Info
allronix:

starberth:

allronix:

Agreed, particularly because Flynn viewed Quorra as a “gift” to users and therefore his perception of her (as portrayed in the film canon, at least) doesn’t allow her to develop any kind of agency. It’s unclear what, if any, actual feelings he might have about Quorra beyond her commodified value to others. I hope sequels (fingers crossed) explore the nature of individual agency in and between the various worlds & systems—the 1982 film set up some interesting hints.

Which brings up and interesting point that Lisberger, Horowitz, Kitiss, Kosinski, and even Monolith and Slave Labor Graphics danced around: 
OK, we unknowingly created sentient synthetic life. Even humble insurance software takes the Turing Test and blows it to subatomic particles. They have their own world, their own society. And, for the most part, they are a willing servant race. 
Oh, crap. Where would anyone begin when it comes to treating the Programs ethically?! 

Wouldn’t that make for a wonderful multigenerational saga, though? It’s a can of worms, yes, but the writer in me says ‘material!’ Those ethical questions could drive an incredible, intense sequel … and open up the potential for a dark second act of “Blade Runner” proportions.

Disney’s not likely to go here because…Disney. That’s some potentially explosive stuff, even by MCU standards. 
Still, might be interesting if you split some of the conflict between Sam and Jet. (That is, if you can find a way to salvage 2.0 from the dustbin) Sam never saw helpful Programs, but he did see plenty of them trying to get him and Quorra killed. They imprisoned and killed his dad, butchered Quorra’s people, and even the great champion was twisted into a monster. Jet had the flip side of that equation; plenty of friendly Programs (the ones who tried to kill him were either corrupted or mistaken, mostly), but a lot of hostile humans looking at that world with greed and lust for power. We don’t know yet how Sam will process his experience, but we do have Jet “on panel” (sort of) having mixed feelings at best about being a User.   

You’re right on all points, of course.  I think what Sam brought in “Legacy” was the childlike wonder of a new world, of new adventures, which cuts across all Disney films.  It’s not always realistic, but it serves as an entry point for new watchers, who often need that sort of touchstone to relax into the experience of what is, essentially, an alien environment. I don’t know if I’m remembering correctly, or not, but I think Kosinski and possibly even Wilde have mentioned the working draft for a sequel leaves much more of the action in the outside/User world. If that’s true, we don’t need as much childlike wonder (though Quorra, perhaps, would show it?). Sam could go to a darker place and not lose his appeal as a character, in my opinion.But really, once you put the revolution of science, religion, medicine, and everything else on the table…character development could quite literally go anywhere.
Zoom Info
allronix:

starberth:

allronix:

Agreed, particularly because Flynn viewed Quorra as a “gift” to users and therefore his perception of her (as portrayed in the film canon, at least) doesn’t allow her to develop any kind of agency. It’s unclear what, if any, actual feelings he might have about Quorra beyond her commodified value to others. I hope sequels (fingers crossed) explore the nature of individual agency in and between the various worlds & systems—the 1982 film set up some interesting hints.

Which brings up and interesting point that Lisberger, Horowitz, Kitiss, Kosinski, and even Monolith and Slave Labor Graphics danced around: 
OK, we unknowingly created sentient synthetic life. Even humble insurance software takes the Turing Test and blows it to subatomic particles. They have their own world, their own society. And, for the most part, they are a willing servant race. 
Oh, crap. Where would anyone begin when it comes to treating the Programs ethically?! 

Wouldn’t that make for a wonderful multigenerational saga, though? It’s a can of worms, yes, but the writer in me says ‘material!’ Those ethical questions could drive an incredible, intense sequel … and open up the potential for a dark second act of “Blade Runner” proportions.

Disney’s not likely to go here because…Disney. That’s some potentially explosive stuff, even by MCU standards. 
Still, might be interesting if you split some of the conflict between Sam and Jet. (That is, if you can find a way to salvage 2.0 from the dustbin) Sam never saw helpful Programs, but he did see plenty of them trying to get him and Quorra killed. They imprisoned and killed his dad, butchered Quorra’s people, and even the great champion was twisted into a monster. Jet had the flip side of that equation; plenty of friendly Programs (the ones who tried to kill him were either corrupted or mistaken, mostly), but a lot of hostile humans looking at that world with greed and lust for power. We don’t know yet how Sam will process his experience, but we do have Jet “on panel” (sort of) having mixed feelings at best about being a User.   

You’re right on all points, of course.  I think what Sam brought in “Legacy” was the childlike wonder of a new world, of new adventures, which cuts across all Disney films.  It’s not always realistic, but it serves as an entry point for new watchers, who often need that sort of touchstone to relax into the experience of what is, essentially, an alien environment. I don’t know if I’m remembering correctly, or not, but I think Kosinski and possibly even Wilde have mentioned the working draft for a sequel leaves much more of the action in the outside/User world. If that’s true, we don’t need as much childlike wonder (though Quorra, perhaps, would show it?). Sam could go to a darker place and not lose his appeal as a character, in my opinion.But really, once you put the revolution of science, religion, medicine, and everything else on the table…character development could quite literally go anywhere.
Zoom Info
allronix:

starberth:

allronix:

Agreed, particularly because Flynn viewed Quorra as a “gift” to users and therefore his perception of her (as portrayed in the film canon, at least) doesn’t allow her to develop any kind of agency. It’s unclear what, if any, actual feelings he might have about Quorra beyond her commodified value to others. I hope sequels (fingers crossed) explore the nature of individual agency in and between the various worlds & systems—the 1982 film set up some interesting hints.

Which brings up and interesting point that Lisberger, Horowitz, Kitiss, Kosinski, and even Monolith and Slave Labor Graphics danced around: 
OK, we unknowingly created sentient synthetic life. Even humble insurance software takes the Turing Test and blows it to subatomic particles. They have their own world, their own society. And, for the most part, they are a willing servant race. 
Oh, crap. Where would anyone begin when it comes to treating the Programs ethically?! 

Wouldn’t that make for a wonderful multigenerational saga, though? It’s a can of worms, yes, but the writer in me says ‘material!’ Those ethical questions could drive an incredible, intense sequel … and open up the potential for a dark second act of “Blade Runner” proportions.

Disney’s not likely to go here because…Disney. That’s some potentially explosive stuff, even by MCU standards. 
Still, might be interesting if you split some of the conflict between Sam and Jet. (That is, if you can find a way to salvage 2.0 from the dustbin) Sam never saw helpful Programs, but he did see plenty of them trying to get him and Quorra killed. They imprisoned and killed his dad, butchered Quorra’s people, and even the great champion was twisted into a monster. Jet had the flip side of that equation; plenty of friendly Programs (the ones who tried to kill him were either corrupted or mistaken, mostly), but a lot of hostile humans looking at that world with greed and lust for power. We don’t know yet how Sam will process his experience, but we do have Jet “on panel” (sort of) having mixed feelings at best about being a User.   

You’re right on all points, of course.  I think what Sam brought in “Legacy” was the childlike wonder of a new world, of new adventures, which cuts across all Disney films.  It’s not always realistic, but it serves as an entry point for new watchers, who often need that sort of touchstone to relax into the experience of what is, essentially, an alien environment. I don’t know if I’m remembering correctly, or not, but I think Kosinski and possibly even Wilde have mentioned the working draft for a sequel leaves much more of the action in the outside/User world. If that’s true, we don’t need as much childlike wonder (though Quorra, perhaps, would show it?). Sam could go to a darker place and not lose his appeal as a character, in my opinion.But really, once you put the revolution of science, religion, medicine, and everything else on the table…character development could quite literally go anywhere.
Zoom Info
allronix:

starberth:

allronix:

Agreed, particularly because Flynn viewed Quorra as a “gift” to users and therefore his perception of her (as portrayed in the film canon, at least) doesn’t allow her to develop any kind of agency. It’s unclear what, if any, actual feelings he might have about Quorra beyond her commodified value to others. I hope sequels (fingers crossed) explore the nature of individual agency in and between the various worlds & systems—the 1982 film set up some interesting hints.

Which brings up and interesting point that Lisberger, Horowitz, Kitiss, Kosinski, and even Monolith and Slave Labor Graphics danced around: 
OK, we unknowingly created sentient synthetic life. Even humble insurance software takes the Turing Test and blows it to subatomic particles. They have their own world, their own society. And, for the most part, they are a willing servant race. 
Oh, crap. Where would anyone begin when it comes to treating the Programs ethically?! 

Wouldn’t that make for a wonderful multigenerational saga, though? It’s a can of worms, yes, but the writer in me says ‘material!’ Those ethical questions could drive an incredible, intense sequel … and open up the potential for a dark second act of “Blade Runner” proportions.

Disney’s not likely to go here because…Disney. That’s some potentially explosive stuff, even by MCU standards. 
Still, might be interesting if you split some of the conflict between Sam and Jet. (That is, if you can find a way to salvage 2.0 from the dustbin) Sam never saw helpful Programs, but he did see plenty of them trying to get him and Quorra killed. They imprisoned and killed his dad, butchered Quorra’s people, and even the great champion was twisted into a monster. Jet had the flip side of that equation; plenty of friendly Programs (the ones who tried to kill him were either corrupted or mistaken, mostly), but a lot of hostile humans looking at that world with greed and lust for power. We don’t know yet how Sam will process his experience, but we do have Jet “on panel” (sort of) having mixed feelings at best about being a User.   

You’re right on all points, of course.  I think what Sam brought in “Legacy” was the childlike wonder of a new world, of new adventures, which cuts across all Disney films.  It’s not always realistic, but it serves as an entry point for new watchers, who often need that sort of touchstone to relax into the experience of what is, essentially, an alien environment. I don’t know if I’m remembering correctly, or not, but I think Kosinski and possibly even Wilde have mentioned the working draft for a sequel leaves much more of the action in the outside/User world. If that’s true, we don’t need as much childlike wonder (though Quorra, perhaps, would show it?). Sam could go to a darker place and not lose his appeal as a character, in my opinion.But really, once you put the revolution of science, religion, medicine, and everything else on the table…character development could quite literally go anywhere.
Zoom Info
allronix:

starberth:

allronix:

Agreed, particularly because Flynn viewed Quorra as a “gift” to users and therefore his perception of her (as portrayed in the film canon, at least) doesn’t allow her to develop any kind of agency. It’s unclear what, if any, actual feelings he might have about Quorra beyond her commodified value to others. I hope sequels (fingers crossed) explore the nature of individual agency in and between the various worlds & systems—the 1982 film set up some interesting hints.

Which brings up and interesting point that Lisberger, Horowitz, Kitiss, Kosinski, and even Monolith and Slave Labor Graphics danced around: 
OK, we unknowingly created sentient synthetic life. Even humble insurance software takes the Turing Test and blows it to subatomic particles. They have their own world, their own society. And, for the most part, they are a willing servant race. 
Oh, crap. Where would anyone begin when it comes to treating the Programs ethically?! 

Wouldn’t that make for a wonderful multigenerational saga, though? It’s a can of worms, yes, but the writer in me says ‘material!’ Those ethical questions could drive an incredible, intense sequel … and open up the potential for a dark second act of “Blade Runner” proportions.

Disney’s not likely to go here because…Disney. That’s some potentially explosive stuff, even by MCU standards. 
Still, might be interesting if you split some of the conflict between Sam and Jet. (That is, if you can find a way to salvage 2.0 from the dustbin) Sam never saw helpful Programs, but he did see plenty of them trying to get him and Quorra killed. They imprisoned and killed his dad, butchered Quorra’s people, and even the great champion was twisted into a monster. Jet had the flip side of that equation; plenty of friendly Programs (the ones who tried to kill him were either corrupted or mistaken, mostly), but a lot of hostile humans looking at that world with greed and lust for power. We don’t know yet how Sam will process his experience, but we do have Jet “on panel” (sort of) having mixed feelings at best about being a User.   

You’re right on all points, of course.  I think what Sam brought in “Legacy” was the childlike wonder of a new world, of new adventures, which cuts across all Disney films.  It’s not always realistic, but it serves as an entry point for new watchers, who often need that sort of touchstone to relax into the experience of what is, essentially, an alien environment. I don’t know if I’m remembering correctly, or not, but I think Kosinski and possibly even Wilde have mentioned the working draft for a sequel leaves much more of the action in the outside/User world. If that’s true, we don’t need as much childlike wonder (though Quorra, perhaps, would show it?). Sam could go to a darker place and not lose his appeal as a character, in my opinion.But really, once you put the revolution of science, religion, medicine, and everything else on the table…character development could quite literally go anywhere.
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Agreed, particularly because Flynn viewed Quorra as a “gift” to users and therefore his perception of her (as portrayed in the film canon, at least) doesn’t allow her to develop any kind of agency. It’s unclear what, if any, actual feelings he might have about Quorra beyond her commodified value to others. I hope sequels (fingers crossed) explore the nature of individual agency in and between the various worlds & systems—the 1982 film set up some interesting hints.

Which brings up and interesting point that Lisberger, Horowitz, Kitiss, Kosinski, and even Monolith and Slave Labor Graphics danced around: 

OK, we unknowingly created sentient synthetic life. Even humble insurance software takes the Turing Test and blows it to subatomic particles. They have their own world, their own society. And, for the most part, they are a willing servant race

Oh, crap. Where would anyone begin when it comes to treating the Programs ethically?! 

Wouldn’t that make for a wonderful multigenerational saga, though? It’s a can of worms, yes, but the writer in me says ‘material!’ Those ethical questions could drive an incredible, intense sequel … and open up the potential for a dark second act of “Blade Runner” proportions.

Disney’s not likely to go here because…Disney. That’s some potentially explosive stuff, even by MCU standards.

Still, might be interesting if you split some of the conflict between Sam and Jet. (That is, if you can find a way to salvage 2.0 from the dustbin) Sam never saw helpful Programs, but he did see plenty of them trying to get him and Quorra killed. They imprisoned and killed his dad, butchered Quorra’s people, and even the great champion was twisted into a monster. Jet had the flip side of that equation; plenty of friendly Programs (the ones who tried to kill him were either corrupted or mistaken, mostly), but a lot of hostile humans looking at that world with greed and lust for power. We don’t know yet how Sam will process his experience, but we do have Jet “on panel” (sort of) having mixed feelings at best about being a User.   

You’re right on all points, of course. I think what Sam brought in “Legacy” was the childlike wonder of a new world, of new adventures, which cuts across all Disney films. It’s not always realistic, but it serves as an entry point for new watchers, who often need that sort of touchstone to relax into the experience of what is, essentially, an alien environment. I don’t know if I’m remembering correctly, or not, but I think Kosinski and possibly even Wilde have mentioned the working draft for a sequel leaves much more of the action in the outside/User world. If that’s true, we don’t need as much childlike wonder (though Quorra, perhaps, would show it?). Sam could go to a darker place and not lose his appeal as a character, in my opinion.

But really, once you put the revolution of science, religion, medicine, and everything else on the table…character development could quite literally go anywhere.